Fibonacci Sequence Spiral Art

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Luke Hutchison noticed that the number of possible ancestors on the human X chromosome inheritance line at a given ancestral generation also follows the Fibonacci sequence. [73] A male individual has an X chromosome, which he received from his mother, and a Y chromosome, which he received from his father. The male counts as the "origin" of his own X chromosome (F1=1{\displaystyle F_{1}=1}), and at his parents' generation, his X chromosome came from a single parent (F2=1{\displaystyle F_{2}=1}). The male's mother received one X chromosome from her mother (the son's maternal grandmother), and one from her father (the son's maternal grandfather), so two grandparents contributed to the male descendant's X chromosome (F3=2{\displaystyle F_{3}=2}). The maternal grandfather received his X chromosome from his mother, and the maternal grandmother received X chromosomes from both of her parents, so three great-grandparents contributed to the male descendant's X chromosome (F4=3{\displaystyle F_{4}=3}). Five great-great-grandparents contributed to the male descendant's X chromosome (F5=5{\displaystyle F_{5}=5}), etc. (Note that this assumes that all ancestors of a given descendant are independent, but if any genealogy is traced far enough back in time, ancestors begin to appear on multiple lines of the genealogy, until eventually a population founder appears on all lines of the genealogy. )